5oci4lm3di4101

The Grand Social Media Experiment. We learn by doing.


Leave a comment

Twitter Tips for All

Twitter logo

Tweet! Tweet!! A little birdie told me…

Thinking about using Twitter? Not sure why you would or if it’s even worth it? Twitter is many different things to many different people. It’s a great place for keeping in touch with friends and family, staying current with what’s happening in the world, and informing others about your business’s products and services.

Twitter is like blogging (it started as a micro-blogging service) and instant messaging combined. It is the ultimate in social messaging, as you can connect with lots of people whenever and wherever you want. It is an event coordinator, a business tool, a news reporting service, and a marketing device.

In order to effectively use Twitter, I’ve put together a list of things to keep in mind as you enter the world of Twitter and get ready to “tweet” (or post) a brief message:

MISC. INFO

  • Maximum length of username is 15 characters—the shorter the better. It will be easier for people to find you.
  • Maximum number of characters per tweet is 140. Leave at least 20 characters free as space for people to retweet you.
  • Twitter shortens links with their internal shortener, or you can use bitly.com. Each link uses up 22 or 23 characters.
  • Starting the beginning of a tweet with @username is a reply. It will only be seen by that person and people who are following both of you (it will also show up on your profile page and in Twitter search). If you tag a username anywhere but at the start of the tweet, everybody following you (including the user) will see that message. This is called a mention.
  • Images dramatically increase social media engagement. A picture on Twitter uses up 23 characters.
  • If you make an error in a tweet, to fix it, delete it first and then re-submit. You cannot edit tweets.

USING TWITTER

  • To be social, when you are mentioned (@username), you should respond to that tweet.
  • Retweet, reply to, and favorite other people’s tweets.
  • People who tweet frequently attract more followers. An active Twitter presence can help a business generate more revenue.
  • Link your tweets to interesting articles you find.
  • Hosting a creative contest or sweepstakes is a great way to improve engagement for businesses.
  • Join a worldwide public conversation by participating in Twitter trends (#hashtags). Twitter provides a daily list of trending topics near the top of your Twitter page on the lefthand side.
  • Behind-the-scenes info and photos are a great way to humanize your business.
  • You can live-tweet anything that would interest your followers and friends. Concerts, low gas prices, Elvis sightings, etc.
  • Quotes are always popular no matter what social media platform you’re on.
  • Create an original meme that fits with your company or product. Everybody loves memes and they often go viral.
  • Use one to two #hashtags per tweet for maximum engagement.
  • Become an expert: inform, talk about your company and other things your audience is interested in.
  • Use Twitter daily—search, lurk, post, retweet.

ADDITIONAL TIPS

  • To grow your community, add your Twitter ID to your email signature and other content, both online and off.
  • It’s OK to schedule tweets, but don’t automate anything.
  • Don’t be a salesperson on Twitter. Instead, be informative, entertaining and social.
  • Don’t ask people to follow you. They probably won’t. Some may unfollow you.

REMEMBER

  • Everything you say can be seen by anyone, right from the start.
  • Your tweets can be found in Twitter search and also by Google and other search engines.
  • Search your company on Twitter. See what people are saying about you. Respond whether good or bad—make things right!
  • Follow 20-30 good users.
  • Google search companies doing well on Twitter and check out what they do; follow them.

Don’t be nervous! The best way to learn is to jump right in and as Nike says, “Just do it!”

—Laura

Liz Lemon saying, "What the what the?"


Leave a comment

Is Cursing Taboo, Blase or OK?

If the Internet hasn’t made our culture more profane, certainly it has diminished our collective shock by curse words. According to a study reported in digitaltrends.com, one in every 13 tweets contain profanity (nsfw, but in case you are at work and curious, you may be as surprised as I was that the C-word ranks 16th). Now, one in 13 is not a shocking figure when you consider anyone with opposable thumbs has a media platform. But for those of us who believe there is more to writing than the ability to navigate a keyboard or message chat acronyms on a smart phone, our audience and message determine the words and language we use.

The lax on the taboos of profanity goes back farther than the Internet and has been happening for decades. It’s been almost ten years since Vice President Dick Cheney told Senator Patrick Leahy to f*** himself, and even though it probably wasn’t the first time that suggestion was offered on the Senate floor, it would have been far more shocking 50 years earlier. It would be even less shocking if it happened today. Perhaps social media and the plethora of smart phones are simply revealing that we were always a culture of potty mouths. But back when a virtual conversation meant something tweeners imagined having with the latest heartthrob on the cover of Tiger Beat, profanity was considered taboo in “mixed company,” meaning when both genders were present. I’d have to try pretty hard to fain shock by the use of “naughty language” today, even though I was raised where my permissible threshold for cursing stopped after darn and before hell (outside its religious context). Mom said the use of profanity demonstrated not only a lack of cultural civility, but a lack of an abundant vocabulary. And even after I rattle off a string of profanity that would prompt Chelsea Handler and Roseanne to rise for a standing ovation (mostly when no one’s around), I remind myself that Mom was right. Words matter.

Whether defining your own voice or that of the organization you represent, the right words will always matter. Broadcasting through social media offers greater freedom but also a greater opportunity to cause damage to your brand if you don’t choose your words carefully. It pays to think before you post because no matter how fleeting your messages may be in the world-wide web of words, remember all posts are permanent and will come back to haunt you if they can. If using one of George Carlin’s famous seven curse words you can never say on television is right for your brand or the audience you want to reach, use them, But the S-word or F-word can be just as dull or jarring as using a fancy, multisyllabic word when it’s not the right word. Using the right language or even inventing new words and phrases will attract the people you want to your site. Think how popular Thirty Rock’s Liz Lemonisms, like blergh, myirt, whuck and jagweed have become.

Recently the AP stylebook, the journalist’s bible, defined “N-word” and “F-word” as the proper style rule when writing those words in print. But Jesse Sheidlower, author of  “The F-Word, The Complete History of the Word. Yes, That One,” contends that the media should reflect the real world and use the actual word when reporting. After all, everyone knows what those acronyms mean, so you could argue substitutions are silly or, at best, only there to protect the innocent. But I doubt there are many children over five who haven’t heard or seen these words many times before. Are the acronyms any less ugly than the words themselves? Would using them shine more light on their vulgarity or are they too offensive for that experiment?

Time will tell whether social media changes the bleep-word practice or other current language mores, like it seems to be changing nearly everything else. And were he alive today, Carlin would agree social media has blurred the lurid language line and he’d have a new, brilliant riff on the subject. WWCT – what would Carlin think – or tweet? SB

 

 

 


Leave a comment

WHERE TO START

Each of these is, of course, dependent on the type of business, organization, or mission.

  • What are you looking to achieve on social media?
  • Look at what channels are being used by similar businesses.
  • Create an account, then sit back and “listen”. Search for relevant keywords and follow the conversations. Get a feel for the channel before posting or commenting.
  • Decide on what “voice” you wish to use for your posts. Even if you have multiple people making posts, they should all be following the same format, goals, and tone.
  • Develop questions that support your goals and objectives.
  • Ask friends, relatives, and regular, recognizable customers for their thoughts and preferences.
  • Survey your current followers for thoughts and ideas of what they would like to see. What channels do they prefer? What are their likes and dislikes?
  • Use focus groups.
  • Listen to the responses. Each answer provides insight and can bring new perspectives.


Leave a comment

You’ve got the RIGHT stuff BABY!!!

Using social media for marketing can enable a small business looking to further their reach to more customers. Your customers are interacting with brands through social media, therefore, having a strong social media presence on the web is the key to tap into their interest. If implemented correctly, marketing with social media can bring you remarkable success! In case you need to be reminded of how great marketing can be for a business, let’s stroll down memory lane with McDonald’s. Brainstorm how these tactics would look through social media…elaborate on that!

  • back in the day (in the ‘60’s), they targeted hard-working moms – “You deserve a break today!”;
  • in the ‘70’s, they marketed to kids, with characters like Ronald McDonald, Hamburglar, and other characters, and introduced Happy Meals (smaller portions and a free toy);
  • in the ‘80’s they offered Dads the “Big Mac” – Baby Boomers everywhere could rhyme off the ingredients (and probably still can today) – “2 all-beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions, on a sesame seed bun” – remember that?, and created Ronald McDonald House(s) charities, to support families with seriously ill children in hospitals;
  • in the ‘90’s, they targeted the teen market with Justin Timberlake, rappers, hip-hop – “I’m lovin’ it!”;
  • in the first decade of the 00’s, they marketed to the wellness-focused, healthy eating audience by introducing wraps, salads, and other alternatives to fried food;
  • now, in the 10’s, nutrition-savvy parents are happy that every McDonald’s includes a play center, and offers healthy foods kids love (apples, grilled cheese, etc.).

Create a social media marketing plan and brainstorm about your goals: what are you hoping to achieve through social media marketing? Who is your target audience? Where would your target audience hang out and how would they use social media? What message do you want to send to your audience with social media marketing?

-Sweetlaw


Leave a comment

Selecting The Right Channel And Making It Meaningful For YOUR Audience

The first step in choosing the right channel for any organization is to ask questions. Here is a brief sampling listed below:

Ask these questions :

1. What will be or what is the voice you want to publicly display?

2. Who do we want to connect with through Social Media?

3. What do we need or want to accomplish through Social Media?

4. What content do we as an organization want to get out?

Once you can answer those questions you are well on the way. this is a short guideline to help gauge your content going forward.

How to have your organization remain meaningful and relevant

I always have a saying that states “I come from love”meaning-I put love in everything I do. Can your organization state the same? Be ready and willing even if, only amongst your staff to take a self-inventory and know the answer to the age-old question of Why?

Listen, You know better than others that receive your message why you matter, count and remain. So connect  to that passion, look back to why you started (mission statement) then your message will remain relevant (look to your goals and objectives)

Quick Tip:  Every three months cross check your objectives, goals, mission with the messages you send. Check In! Are they in line?  Do they need a Band-Aid, Ointment or an appointment (see my other posting)

JKT


Leave a comment

Week 5: How to best engage your audience?

http://www.spiral16.com/blog/2013/06/strategic-listening-engagement-spurs-ecommerce/

This is a great article on engaging your audience using creativity.

It talks about showing your personality trough your social media posts and content. By truly interacting with your audience and customers you will achieve results. The article also sums it up. That your social media strategies for engaging one, should contain these.

  1. Understand why people use social media.
  2. Be shareable.
  3. Have casual contact with consumers.
  4. Go where the community is.
  5. Build relationships with influencers.

Don’t disrupt the user’s usual social patterns; embed yourself within them. Become a part of their group and interact with them, not at them. If you create high quality content, that is shareable, your brand can go from “stuffy and boring ” to fun and spread and go viral. CHB

 


Leave a comment

For the Birds: A Field Guide to Social Media Channels

Sure, you know about Twitter. But what about Chirp, Chirpify and the rest of the 200 or so channels out there?

It’s not your imagination. New social media channels really are popping up every few months. A study by Experian predicts that “Deeper functional[it]y, combined with a lower technical barrier to entry, will result in new leaders in social media being created, accepted and used within a matter of days.”

So how do you select the right channels for your organization? As with marketing communications generally, there’s a strategic as well as a tactical answer to that question.

Start with yourself. That’s the advice of Catherine Parker, author of 301 Ways to Use Social Media to Boost Your Marketing. For example, if your professional product is highly visual—or text-heavy—choose your channels accordingly. “Know your business’s strengths and weaknesses,” Parker advises (Tip 2).

Just as field guides help birders identify the hundreds of avian species in the USA, the “conversation prism,” reproduced here, guides marketers to the social media environment and its native inhabitants.

Social media guru Brian Solis, developer of the conversation prism, places “YOU” at the center of the social universe. In order to choose the right channels, Solis suggests, first consider your vision, purpose, value, commitment, and transparency with regard to social media.

“Social is not a silo or a function, it is a way of business. It is intended to mature business perspective from a command and control mentality to that of engagement and openness.”—Brian Solis

Next, identify your priority audience segment(s). This is partly a demographic exercise: who are they and how do they prefer to communicate? It’s also a functional exercise: what task are they trying to accomplish at a given time? What’s their strategy for engaging with social media?

With a little research, you’ll be able to identify your segments’ “native habitat” in the social media environment. Using the outer rim of the conversation prism, you can then make tactical choices to convey your message through the channels your audiences will appreciate.

As a bonus, you’ll be better prepared to create relevant and meaningful content. Information, entertainment, and applications can take different forms, depending on the channel you choose and the audience you plan to engage there. (We’ve written elsewhere on “value” and values in social media.)

Happy birding! (LA)